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Course Objectives

Aim

The overall aim of the B. A. Sociology programme is to equip students with the basic and applied knowledge, values and skill of Sociology.

 Objectives

  1. To develop the skills to think “objectively” and analytically about ways in which social forces affect our everyday lives
  2. To understand the perspectives of persons with different cultural, ethnic and social background
  3. To develop some understanding of social science research techniques, their assumptions, strengths and weaknesses
  4. To become familiar with the major schools of thought, research findings, and theories of Sociology
  5. To be able to identify and discuss the differences between the three major theoretical paradigms used by sociologists in the analysis of society
  6. To develop the ability to examine critically the institutions and social organizations both in Ghana and elsewhere, and to recognize the importance of the interdependence of our world’s indigenes and peoples.

YEAR ONE

SOC 151:   INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY I

The course covers the origins, nature and meaning of Sociology. This concerns the nature and uses of basic concepts of Sociology.  Some major topics include norms, values, status and roles; Institutions, interaction in relationship to evolutionary, interactionists, and conflict perspectives. Others deal with focus and insights into social processes, socialization, social control; social stratification and conflict perspectives.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Chinoy, E., (1976): Society: An Introduction to Sociology.Random house, New York.
  • Gidden, A & Sutton P. W., (2010): Sociology, (6th Edition) Delhi, John and Sons.

                                                                 

SOC 152:   INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY II

Some of the ideas and contributions of the founding fathers: Comte, Durkheim, Marx and Weber; relationship between Sociology and other social sciences, such as Psychology, Anthropology, Economics, Law, and Political Sciences.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Chinoy, E., (1976): Society: An Introduction to Sociology.Random house, New York. 
  • Gidden, A & Sutton P. W., (2010): Sociology, (6th Edition) Delhi, John and Sons.
  • Kirby, M., (1997): Sociology in Perspective, Oxford, Heinemann.

                                                                       

SOC 153:   SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND WORLD CULTURES 1

The focus of the course is primarily to introduce students to diversity human cultures. It seeks to analyze and illustrate culture from different human societies across the world. The major areas to be covered are as follows: ethnicity, cultural uniformity and diversity and various modes of adaptive strategies such as hunting and gathering, horticulture, pastoralism, agriculture and industrialization.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Asante, E., (2007):Culture, Politics and Development. Ethical and Theological. Reflections on the Ghanaian Experience.
  • Nukunya, G.K., (2003): Tradition and Change:An Introduction to Sociology: Ghana University Press, Accra.
  • Awedoba, A. K. (2002): Culture and Development in Africa with special reference to Ghana. Basic issues Vol. 1 Institute of African studies. University of Ghana, Legon.
  • Carneiro, R., (1968). The transition from Hunting to Horticulture in the Amazon Basin Aldine Press, Chicago.

                                                                                   

SOC 154:   SOCIAL ORGANIZATION AND WORLD CULTURES II

The course seeks to introduce students to the study of human society and culture.  Special attention will be paid to the examination of socio-cultural arrangements and organizations of some societies or tribes especially in Africa. The major topics for discussion include social control mechanisms, the concepts of reciprocity and reasonable man, population trends in societies and social organization of the Nuer of Sudan and the Zulu of South Africa.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Asante, E., (2007):Culture, Politics and Development. Ethical and Theological. Reflections on the Ghanaian Experience.
  • Mayo, M. (2003): Rethinking the Reasonable Person: An Egalitarian Reconstruction of the objective standard. Oxford University Press, New York.
  • Awedoba, A. K. (2002); Culture and Development in Africa with special reference to Ghana. Basic issues, Vol. 1. Institute of African Studies, University of Ghana, Legon.
  • Nukunya, G.K., (2003): Tradition and Change:An Introduction to Sociology: Ghana University Press, Accra.

                                                                                                                                   

MATH 153:   STATISTICAL METHODS I

Introduction to the study of statistics: General introduction to the nature and use of statistics and some basic concepts.  Descriptive analysis of data: Graphic and tabular representation of data, calculation of measures of central tendency and dispersion, as well as coefficients of skewness and kurtosis.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Freedman, D. (2000): Statistical Models and Causal Inference: A Dialogue with the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, Chapters 1-3, 8.
  • Jackman, S. (2009):. Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences. John Wiley and Sons.

 

MATH 154:  STATISTICAL METHODS II

Probability: Definition of some basic terms; conditional and independent events; some basic laws and rules in probability; random variables and probability distributions; expectations and variance of random variables; discrete distributions: binomial and Poisson; continuous distributions: normal; sampling theory.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

 

Recommended reading material:

  • Freedman, D., 2000): Statistical Models and Causal Inference: A Dialogue with the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, Chapters 1-3, 8.
  • Jackman, S., (2009): Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences. John Wiley and Sons

ENGL 157:  COMMUNICATION SKILLS 1

The course takes all first year students through a review of English grammar and is a required course for all first year students of the KNUST.  Students will be assisted to review some of the common problem areas of writing, such as verb/tense system, concord, sentence construction and paragraph organization. There shall also be a study of basic grammatical structures that shall involve teaching students to write formally correct sentences, avoiding sentence errors and using punctuation marks effectively.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Deux,  M., (2009): A communicative Approach. 4th Edition. McGraw Hill Higher Education.
  • Leo J., (1994): A communicative Grammar Practice. Cambridge University Press.

 

ENGL 158:  COMMUNICATION SKILLS II

This course is designed to continue the process of helping students to become better writers. The first part of the course will focus on writing skills – paragraphs, and then essays.  Students shall also study the preparation of technical documents such as memos, reports and proposals.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Deux,  M., (2009): A communicative Approach. 4th Edition. McGraw Hill Higher Education.
  • Leo, J., (1994): A communicative Grammar Practice. Cambridge University Press.

 

CSM 183: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS I

General Introduction to Computers: Generation and Classification  of Computers, Basic Parts of a Desktop Computer, Processing Devices, Input/Output Devices, Storage Devices, System Software, Application Software. The Windows Operating System: Basic Windows Features, The Control Panel, File Management.Word Processing Using MS-Word: Basics of Word processing using MS-Word, Checking Spelling and Grammar Mistakes, Working with Hyperlinks, Formatting and Printing Text, Inserting Illustrations, Modifying Page Layout, Working with Headers and Footers, Finding and Replacing Text, Using references, Adding New Citation  and Sources to a Document, Generating a Bibliography, Indexes and Table of Content, Mail Merge.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sawyer, W. H., (2000): Using Information Technology: A practical introduction to Computers & Communications. Second Edition. McGraw Hill.
  • Hutchinson, S., (2007). Computers: The user perspective. Second Edition. Mosby College publishing.

 

CSM 184: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS II

Introduction to MS-Excel: Creating and Editing Worksheets, Formulas and Functions, Formatting Worksheets, Printing Worksheets, Creating Excel Charts (Graphs), Sorting and Filtering Data.Introduction to MS-Power Point: The Basics of Creating Presentations, About Slides and Layouts, Different Slide Views, Basics of Inserting and Editing Text, Formatting Text, Themes and Background Styles, Starting A Slide Show, Inserting Pictures, Sound and Movies, Inserting and Modifying Clip Art, Ordering Objects, Inserting Charts, Viewing and Printing Charts, Animating Text and Objects, Applying Transitions.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sawyer, W. H., (2000). Using Information Technology: A practical introduction to Computers & Communications. Second Edition. McGraw Hill.
  • Hutchinson, S., (2007). Computers: The user perspective. Second Edition. Mosby College publishing.

 

 YEAR TWO

SOC 251: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT I

This course provides review of ideas and writings of Augustes Comte, Karl Marx, Herbert Spencer, Max weber and Emile Durkheim. The course is intended to furnish that kind of knowledge to contribute to what might be called Social Ecology and Sociological Ideas.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Allahar, A., (1995): Social and Periphery: Theories and Issues, Toronto: Garamond Press
  • Vander-Zanden, J.W., (1990): Sociology: The Core, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 252:   INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGICAL THOUGHT II

The course will focus on the works and the social structure in which the following sociological theorists are variously placed:  George Simmel, Charles Horton Cooley, George Herbert Mead, Robert Ezra Park and V. Pareto.  An attempt will be made to elucidate and investigate the role of theorists within the social structure and the relationship between theory and research and their use for sociological analysis and relate these to African situation.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Allahar, A.L., (1995). Social and Periphery: Theories and Issues, Toronto: Garamond Press.
  • Vander-Zanden, J.W., (1990). Sociology: The Core, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 253:  SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF GHANA I

The course will involve analysis of social structure and spatial distribution of major ethnic groups before 1902. Emphasis will be on marriage systems, family and lineage, Ghanaian cosmology, traditional religious beliefs and their functions, political structure, economic structure, health institution, education and social stratification.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Assimeng, M., (1999): Social Structure of Ghana: A Study in Persistence and Change Ghana Publishing Corporation, Tema.
  • Southall, A.,  (1961): Social Change in Modern Africa. London, Oxford University Press.
  • Nukunya, G.K., (2003): Tradition and Change:An Introduction to Sociology: Ghana University Press, Accra.

 

SOC 254:   SOCIAL STRUCTURE OF GHANA II

The second part is designed to explain the impact of social change on the traditional Ghanaian social structure. The main objective is to enable students to understand the institutional adaptation brought about by social change.  Trends in industrialization and urbanization and their consequences, social stratification and contemporary social problems such as ethnicity, bribery and corruption, population trends and the effects of rural-urban migration will also be discussed.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Assimeng, M., (1999): Social Structure of Ghana: A Study in Persistence and Change Ghana Publishing Corporation, Tema.
  • Southall, A., (1961): Social Change in Modern Africa. London, Oxford University Press.
  • Nukunya, G.K., (2003): Tradition and Change:An Introduction to Sociology: Ghana University Press, Accra.

 

SOC 255 URBAN SOCIOLOGY I

The course focuses on urbanization in ancient, medieval and modern industrial societies and developing countries. Major areas to be treated include city location, urban growth, slums, regional ecology, etc, city planning, social organization and mass phenomena, with special reference to African cities, including urban personality, leisure activities and voluntary associations.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Abotchie, C. (2008). Sociology of urban communities, Accra, Hans Publications
  • Yankson, P. W. K. ((2006): Urbanization and National Development: Challenges and Prospects of Economic Reform and Globalization. Accra, Ghana Universities Press.

 

SOC 256:  URBAN SOCIOLOGY II

Students will be equipped with knowledge in social stratification and municipal political organization, urban social problems and social welfare (including social and personal disorganization) and techniques of urban research. Students will be expected to be familiar with studies of African cities.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Abotchie, C. (2008): Sociology of Urban Communities, Accra, Hans Publications
  • Yankson, P. W. K. ((2006): Urbanization and National Development: Challenges and Prospects of Economic Reform and Globalization. Accra, Ghana Universities Press.

 

ENGL 263:  LITERATURE IN ENGLISH (POETRY AND DRAMA) I

This is a basic course in Literature, introducing all university students to opportunities to enjoy and to love the world of books in English and in our various Ghanaian languages.  Special consideration will be given to language as the primary vehicle of literature.   Old classics as well as significant contemporary works by living authors will be studied.

 The course will also draw on the stock of Africa’s oral literary disciplinary backgrounds and interests of the students who are expected to take this, the selection of texts will take into consideration the interrelations of literature and other disciplines.  The course will focus on poetry and drama.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Bain C., Beaty J., Hunter P. J., (2001): The Norton Introduction to Literature. W. W Norton & Company.
  • Bertens H., (2009): Literary Theory: The Basics. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. TJ International Ltd. Padstow, Cornwall.

 

ENGL 264:  LITERATURE IN ENGLISH II

This course has as its main components the study of folktales, short stories and the novel.  African and western texts representative of this genre shall be used to illustrate the language, themes, and the literary devices employed for these different types of fictional expressions.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Bain C., Beaty J., Hunter P. J., (2001): The Norton Introduction to Literature. W. W Norton & Company.
  • Bertens H., (2009): Literary Theory: The Basics. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. TJ International Ltd. Padstow, Cornwall.

 

YEAR THREE

SOC 351:  PERSPECTIVES IN SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY I

The course basically looks at the development and nature of sociological theory. A focus will be on sociological theories as an activity from the late 18th Century to 20th Century.  Sociology as a distinctive field, the requirements as envisaged by the founding fathers:  Comte (Positivism, Social Statics, and Social Dynamics); Durkheim’s Methodology (Social as limit and constraint, Causal and Functional analysis, Social Facts, Suicide, Mechanical and Organic Solidarity); Weber’s Methodology (The Rationalization Thesis, Bureaucracy and ‘Iron Cage’, Ideal Type and Analysis of Social Action, Power and authority relationships).

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Turner, J.H., (2007): The Structure of Sociological Theory, India: Rawat.
  • Turner, J.H. (1994): Sociology: Concepts and Uses, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 352:   PERSPECTIVES IN SOCIOLOGICAL THEORY II

The second semester deals with contemporary centres of interest, i.e. social conflict and social stratification. Major topics are Marxism – “Historical and Dialectical Materialism”, labour theory of surplus value, development of the capitalist mode of production, crisis and ideology, alienation, and symbolic interactionism. Ethnomethodology, i.e. Harold Garfinkel contemporary 21st Century currents of thoughts:  The concept of post-capitalist society, structural determination of social class boundaries, a la Prof. NicosPoulantzaset al; and contradictory locations within class relations, a lá Prof Ohlin Wright.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Turner, J.H., (2007): The Structure of Sociological Theory, India: Rawat.
  • Turner, J.H. (1994): Sociology: Concepts and Uses, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 353:   RESEARCH METHODS I

This course aims to understand the methods of research, data collection, processing, analysis and interpretation.  It stimulates interest in research into human needs and communities, the theoretical basis of research, types of problems and their formulation; types of research - exploratory, descriptive, explanatory, sampling techniques,  research writing, developing outline, referencing and bibliography.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

 Recommended reading material:

  • Sommers, R. & Sommers, B., (2002): (5thEdn) A Practical Guide to Behavoural Research: Tools and Techniques, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Leedy, P.  D.  & Ormond, J. E., (2005): (8thEdn) Practical Research, Planning  and Design, New Jersey;  Pearson Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 354:  RESEARCH METHODS II

The second semester continues with the examination of the remaining topics of research.  It will deal with methods of collecting information, data processing, analysis, interpretation and presentation of data, developing a framework of analysis e.g. Frequency distribution, cross tabulation, statistical procedures and analysis, role of computer in research statistics.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sommers, R. & Sommers, B., (2002): (5thEdn) A Practical Guide to Behavoural Research: Tools and Techniques, Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Leedy, P.  D.  & Ormond, J. E., (2005): (8thEdn) Practical Research, Planning  and Design, New Jersey;  Pearson Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 363:  RURAL SOCIOLOGY I

The main focus of this course is to identify from a sociological perspective the institutional arrangements which characterize the rural way of life as distinct from the urban.  The course affords students the opportunity to know and understand the characteristics of rural people. The course would cover the following major areas: theoretical approaches to the study of rural areas, importance of rural societies, rural settlement patterns and rural social structure.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Hardiman, M., (2003).  Konkonuru: Life in West African Village, Ghana University press,  Accra
  • Odotei, I.K.&Awedoba, A. K. (2006): Chieftaincy in Ghana: Culture, Governance and Development Sub-Saharan Publishers, Accra.

 

 SOC 364:  RURAL SOCIOLOGY II

The course focuses on the understanding of the complex problems of Rural Development of the developing world. The meaning and causes of rural poverty and the role of the state in the variety of developmental programmes will be studied. Other important areas to be treated include the concept of rural development, rural participation appraisal, women in rural societies, and youth in rural development.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Hardiman, M., (2003):  Konkonuru, Life in West African Village, Ghana University press,  Accra.
  • Odotei, I.K. &Awedoba, A. K.  (2006): Chieftaincy in Ghana: Culture, Governance and Development Sub-Saharan Publishers, Accra.

 

SOC 355: SOCIOLOGY OF LAW I

The course seeks to highlight the relationship between law, society and social organization.  The interest of the course has to do with the interpretation and explanation of social phenomena as they relate to law. It examines theories and philosophies of law and legal systems, judicial organization and behaviorism, as well as sociological movement in law.  The meaning, sources and significance of law in society. Sociological approaches in the analysis of law. Law, social law, and social control.A focus on the classical and contemporary theories and philosophies of law, legal cultures, judicial organisation and behaviourism.Sociological movement in law, micro-sociology and differential sociology of law.Race, globalisation, feminism and Law.Social inequality and law.Law, society and economy.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Stewart M., Lawrence F., & Elizabeth M., (2007): Law in Action” A Sociolegal Reader. New York: Foundation Press.
  • Javier T., (2008). The Sociology of Law: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives. Transaction Publishers.
  • Nicholas S. T., (2009): An Introduction to the Sociology of Law. 3rd Edition, Transaction Publishers, New Branswick, New Jersey.

 

SOC 356: SOCIOLOGY OF LAW II

It is not a course in law but a sociological analysis of law.  Students will be introduced to the dialectical relationship between law and the society. It is of importance not only to the sociology students but also to law students so as to enable them interpret legal instruments bearing in mind the sociological implications. The historical development of Ghana Legal System.The court structure and legal pluralism in Ghana.Sociological implications of contemporary legal systems in Ghana. The role of legal agents and agencies in the administration of law and justice – lawyers, judges, police, courts, prisons, etc. Vulnerability, protection and human rights in Ghana.Statism, social structure, law and social change in Ghana.Law, custom and morality.Law, justice and rule of law.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Stewart M., Lawrence F., & Elizabeth M., (2007): Law in Action” A Sociolegal Reader. New York: Foundation Press.
  • Javier T., (2008). The Sociology of Law: Classical and Contemporary Perspectives. Transaction Publishers.
  • Nicholas S. T., (2009): An Introduction to the Sociology of Law. 3rd Edition, Transaction Publishers, New Branswick, New Jersey.

 

SOC 359:  ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR I

The course covers the nature, meaning and characteristics of organizational behaviour.  Other topics include individual and group behaviour in organizations and the instructions that influence management’s decision-making and management styles, psychological concepts and behaviour within organization and management.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Greenberg, J., Baron, R., Sales, C., Owen, F., (1995): Behaviour in Organisations,  Prentice Hall, Canada Inc., Scarborough &Otano.
  • Hellriegel, D., Slocum, Jr., Woodman, R., (1999): OrganisationalBehaviour, New York: West Publishing Company.
  • Herzberg, F., (1989): One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employee?, Classic Readings in OrganisationalBehaviour, Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.
  • Luthans, F., (1995) OrganisationalBehaviour, New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.
  • McShane, S. L. and Von Glinow, M. A., (2000), OrganisationalBehaviour: Emerging Realities for the Workplace Revolution, Boston: Irwin McGraw Hill.
  • Mullins, L. J. (2006), Essentials of OrganisationalBehaviour, Harlow, England: Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 360:  ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR II

The relevant areas of concern for the study are socialization into organization, leaderships and leadership styles, power and influence, conflict management, communication, decision-making and stress management. Individuals at work, individual differences, sources of social influence on behavior, motivation, process of motivation, traditional human relations and human resource, organizational culture and components, will also be studied.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Greenberg, J., Baron, R., Sales, C., Owen, F., (1995): Behaviour in Organisations,  Prentice Hall, Canada Inc., Scarborough &Otano.
  • Hellriegel, D., Slocum, Jr., Woodman, R., (1999): OrganisationalBehaviour, New York: West Publishing Company.
  • Herzberg, F., (1989): One More Time: How Do You Motivate Employee?, Classic Readings in OrganisationalBehaviour, Pacific Grove, CA: Brooks/Cole Publishing Company.
  • Luthans, F., (1995) OrganisationalBehaviour, New York: McGraw-Hill Inc.
  • McShane, S. L. and Von Glinow, M. A., (2000), OrganisationalBehaviour: Emerging Realities for the Workplace Revolution, Boston: Irwin McGraw Hill.
  • Mullins, L. J. (2006), Essentials of OrganisationalBehaviour, Harlow, England: Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 361:  INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY I

The course mainly analyses industrialization and industrial society, the genesis and importance of industrial sociology, the nature of work, effects of mechanization on society. Other major topics border around methods of studying work, authority and bureaucracy in the work organization, organizational dynamics and change, the role of management, managerial philosophies, supervision and communication, chain of command and span of control. The role of the foreman in industry and de-skilling of the labour process will also be discussed.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Todeva E. &Knoke D., (2001): Strategic Alliances and Corporate Social Capital, Kolner
  • Thompson, A. (1995): Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 362:  INDUSTRIAL SOCIOLOGY II

The course examines Informal organization, group cohesions, leadership, morale, productivity and labour force. Collective bargaining, legal action, career and occupational mobility, status, prestige, industry-community relations, labour statistics and industrial research form other major topics. Models relating to human relations approach, analysis of the Hawthorne studies, Scientific Principles of Management (F.W. Taylor), leadership styles, relationship between leadership, supervisory style and productivity will also be taught.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Todeva E &Knoke D., (2001), Strategic Alliances and Corporate Social Capital, Kolner
  • Thompson, A. (1995): Strategic Management: Concepts and Cases, New York: McGraw Hill.

 

SOC 365:  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY 1

The main thrust of this course is to explain how social factors, such as lifestyles affect health. Also, the social functions of health institutions and organizations will be examined. The course also investigates the styles of social behaviour characteristic of health personnel and those who are consumers of health care. The health differences between men and women, advanced nations and developing nations, as well as the rich and the poor would be critically examined. The course also examines the socio-cultural underpinning of health and illness as well as health care policies and practices. It discusses health as a human value and outlines the rationale and scope of medical sociology, the social science approach to understanding health and illness theoretical perspectives in medical sociology.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Freund, P. E.S. &McGrurie, M. B. (1995): Health, Illness and the Social Body; A Critical Sociology. 2nd Ed Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.
  • Weiss, G. L. &Lonnquist, L. E. (2006): The Sociology of Health, Healing and Illness. 5th Ed. Pearson, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
  • Mechanic, David (1978). Medical Sociology. N.Y.: The Free Press.

 

SOC 366:  MEDICAL SOCIOLOGY II

The course examines the medical ethics particularly the areas of concern in medical ethics, the hospital organization (general and mental hospitals) and the role of health practitioners, such as nurses, physicians, pharmacists and dentists. Issues of Non-Traditional Medical Practice, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM), social stress, dying and euthanasia, and the National Health Insurance Scheme, among others, will be discussed during the course. Also it will examine historical policies of health in Ghana, state institutions for delivery of health and, regulatory frame work for medicines and health care provisions for the aged and the disabled.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Freund, P. E.S. &McGrurie, M. B. (1995): Health, Illness and the Social Body; A Critical Sociology. 2nd Ed Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.
  • Weiss, G. L. &Lonnquist, L. E. (2006): The Sociology of Health, Healing and Illness. 5th Ed. Pearson, Prentice Hall, Upper Saddle River, New Jersey
  • Helman, C. G. (1990). Culture, Health and Illness. London: Butterworth & Co. Ltd.
  • Assimeng, J. M. (1981). Social Structure of Ghana. Tema: Ghana Publishing Corporation.
  • Twumasi, P. A. (1975). Medical Systems in Ghana. Tema: Ghana Publishing Corporation.

 

SOC 367:  SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION I

The course introduces students to the definition, nature and purpose of sociology of education. It focuses on the Culture and social functions of school education, agencies of education and teaching as a profession. It also treats moral education, which is an application of the Sociology of Education. The course examines the spirit of discipline, attachment to social groups, autonomy or self-determination, discipline and the Psychology of the child, the school as a social system, the school in the community and Parent/Teacher Association (PTA).

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Collins, R (1988): Theoretical Sociology, San Diego, Harcourt Publishers
  • Leeson, P. F. & Minogue, M. M. (1998): Perspective on Development Cross Disciplinary Themes in Develop Manchester, Manchester University Press.

 

SOC 368:  SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION II

The course will examine the sociological role of the teacher in school and some sociological issues in education, such as problem behaviour, delinquency, drug abuse, teenage pregnancy, de-boardinization, preparatory schools and students’ unrest. The use of punishment in schools and the meaning and uses of rewards, the influence of the school environment, teaching aesthetics and history are also discussed.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Collins, R (1988): Theoretical Sociology, San Diego, Harcourt Publishers
  • Leeson, P. F. and Minogue, M. M. (1998): Perspective on Development Cross Disciplinary Themes in Develop Manchester, Manchester University Press.

 

SOC 369:  POPULATION STUDIES I

The course covers basic knowledge in population studies, i.e. rudimentary demographic techniques to analysis census, survey and vital statistical data. Concepts, measures and analysis of population dynamics – fertility and migration, population projections and their relevance to issues in population studies also form part of this course.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Crow, B., (1992): Survival and Change in the Third World, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. 
  • Cartwright, D. and Zander, A., (1960): Group Dynamics: Research and Theory, Evanston, IL: Row, Peterson.

 

SOC 370:  POPULATION STUDIES II

The portion of the course critically examines interrelationships with social and economic changes. Interpretation and appreciation of demographic information within the context of sociology, their critical relevance in political, social and economic planning, especially education, health and public services are also treated.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Crow, B., (1992): Survival and Change in the Third World, Oxford: Blackwell Publishers. 
  • Cartwright, D. and Zander, A., (1960): Group Dynamics: Research and Theory, Evanston, IL: Row, Peterson.

 

SOC 371:  GERONTOLOGY I

The focus of this course is on working with older people. The main topics include theories of aging, social, psychological, physical aspect and economic determinants of aging. The aged population, their needs, available resources and services in the community, assisting the aged in obtaining services, implications for the future, policy response to aging in Africa, elder abuse and combativeness would be assessed.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Dulmus, C.N. (2007): Adult Development and Well-Being, New York: Haworth Press Inc.
  • Tucker, W. (2007): How People Change, New York: Other Press.

 

SOC 372:  GERONTOLOGY II

The course continues with the adaptation and life satisfaction in old age, personal adjustment problems, marital problems, family conflict, relocation, adjustment to separation and loneliness, anxiety over limited income, mental illness and interpersonal loss, among others.  The basic objective of the course is to equip students with knowledge, and skills to be able to assists the elderly in order to experience a sense of satisfaction, accomplishment, retirement and contentment.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Dulmus, C.N. (2007): Adult Development and Well-Being, New York: Haworth Press Inc.
  • Tucker, W. (2007): How People Change, New York: Other Press.

 

SOC 373: POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY I

Political sociology is a broad (and growing) field within sociology.  It encompasses such varied topics as revolutions, state formation, voting behaviour, power, globalization, and many others.  This course is designed to provide a general overview of major topics, theories, and research in political sociology.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Ocquay, M., (1980): Politics in Ghana: 1972 - 1979, Accra: Tornado Publications.
  • Fortes, M. and Evans-Pritchard, E., (1940): African Political Systems, London; Allen and Unwin.     

 

SOC 374: POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY II

This course examines major theoretical questions about power, politics, and the state from a sociological perspective. It also looks at a number of major topics within the field, including historical questions concerning state formation and nationalism, social movements, globalization, political culture and participation, and civil society. It concerns itself about the origins of the Civil Rights movements, changes in voting patterns and political participation, campaign finance in elections, and the place of Ghana in a global society.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Ocquay, M., (1980): Politics in Ghana; 1972 - 1979, Accra; Tornado Publications.
  • Fortes, M. & Evans-Pritchard, E., (1940): African Political Systems, London; Allen and Unwin.     

 

YEAR FOUR

SOC 451:  DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL I

The course deals with the analysis of the social deviation and control. The first semester deals with the causes and theories of deviance, firstly, Lombroso theory of crime; Attachism non-sociological causes, which are major claims of outstanding theorists, i.e. bio-genic and psycho-genic explanations, deviant behaviour as a manifestation of a defective human being, and perception of deviance as a pathology (sickness) arising from defective environment; unfavourable and pathological circumstances, (industrialism)  juvenile deviancy and illegitimate opportunity structures. Interactionist/Labeling theories of social production of deviance and the effects of labeling on behavior are also treated in the first semester).

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • White, R. & Fiona, H. (2000): Crime and Criminology, 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.
  • Marshall, B. & Robert, M. (1998): Sociology of Deviant Behaviour, 10th Edition, Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

 

SOC 452:  DEVIANCE AND SOCIAL CONTROL II

Further discussion in the second semester leads to the understanding of the interplay between human nature, communities and the methods of exercising law and order.  Other topics examines deviance within organisations, white collar and occupational crimes,  organized crimes against interactionist background, Marxian perspective, historical development and operations of capitalist economy, domination and repression, crimes of governments against crimes of accommodation and resistance.  Finally the course deals with sexual deviance – homosexuality and prostitution.  Treatment or correctional measures, in Ghana  including law enforcement agencies, therapeutic state versus the penal system,    rehabilitation and preventive measures, will also be treated.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • White, R. & Fiona, H. (2000): Crime and Criminology, 2nd Edition, Oxford University Press.
  • Marshall, B. & Robert, M. (1998): Sociology of Deviant Behaviour, 10th Edition, Harcourt Brace College Publishers.

 

SOC 453:  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY I

The course examines the importance of Social Psychology in understanding human behavior in the society.  It includes the nature and scope of Social Psychology, general outline on basic psychological principles in motivation, emotion, learning, thinking and remembering, as well as the basic social interpersonal behavioural events as they occur within group contexts.  Particular attention will be also focused on intra-group processes and the applicability of social psychology to real life situations.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sommers, S.R., & Ellsworth, P.C. (2000): Race in the courtroom: Perceptions of guilt and dispositional attributions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1367-1379.
  • Wrightsman, L.S., Greene, E., Nietzel, M.T., & Fortune, W.H. (2002): Psychology and the legal system. 5thEdition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

 

SOC 454:  SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY II

This part of the course involves theoretical perspectives on development of social and cultural bases and origins of the idea of development in human societies. It treats the definitions of development, the social sciences and development composite indicators, social attitudes, social perception, stereotypes and prejudice.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sommers, S.R., & Ellsworth, P.C. (2000): Race in the courtroom: Perceptions of guilt and dispositional attributions. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 26, 1367-1379.
  • Wrightsman, L.S., Greene, E., Nietzel, M.T., & Fortune, W.H. (2002): Psychology and the Legal System. 5thEdition. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

 

 SOC 455: SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY I

The course is intended to provide a systematic and critical analysis of the fundamental methods of Social Anthropology and the basic substantive and theoretical issues. Specific topics to be covered are the subject matter of Social Anthropology, historical foundations and development of Social Anthropology; problems of social anthropological research; anthropological studies of complex societies; critique on the studies of Africa; the controversy of Social Anthropology being a science or art; the present state of Social Anthropology in African Universities and Applied Social Anthropology.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sarpong, P., (1974): Ghana in Retrospect: Some Aspects of Ghana Culture, Tema: Ghana Publishing Corporation.
  • Wood, S. N., (1997): Values, Standards and Traditional Practices in Ghana Organisational Life, Accra: Asempa Publishers

  

SOC 456: SOCIAL ANTHROPOLOGY II

This part of the course examines critically the institution and the social organizations in simple preliterate societies. Specific topics to be covered are as follows: kinship and family; features of patrilineal societies; features of matrilineal societies; marriage and divorce; political; economic, and religious institutions; social change and urbanization.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sarpong, P., (1974): Ghana in Retrospect: Some Aspects of Ghana Culture, Tema: Ghana Publishing Corporation.
  • Wood, S. N., (1997): Values, Standards and Traditional Practices in Ghana Organisational Life, Accra: Asempa Publishers.

 

SOC 457:  SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT I

The course is essentially designed to relate theories of development to the development process in the developing countries and make critical analysis of development among nations.  It also focuses on theoretical and comparative perspectives on development and examines social, cultural bases and origins of the idea of development in human societies. The major topics to be discussed include the following: the concept of social development, classical theories of development, historical events that shaped the ideas of progress and paradigms of development and underdevelopment.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Cargan, I. and Ballantine, J. (1993): Sociological Footprint: Introductory Readings in Sociology, Wadsworth Publishing Company
  • Collins, A. and Mackowsky, M. (1993): The Discovery Of Society, McGraw-Hill Inc.
  • David, H. & Mark, T. (1990): Sociology and Development Theories, Policies and Practices.

 

SOC 458:  SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT II

This session seeks to offer students critical analysis of selected topics relevant for understanding conditions that facilitate and inhibit development in the developing countries. The course covers the recent re-orientations and issues in the field ofdevelopment studies. It also encompasses such varied topics as religion and development, education and development, aid and its implications for development, poverty and development, and technology and development.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Cargan, I. and Ballantine, J. (1993): Sociological Footprint: Introductory Readings in Sociology, Wadsworth Publishing Company
  • Collins, A. and Mackowsky, M. (1993): The Discovery Of Society, McGraw-Hill Inc.
  • David, H. & Mark, T. (1990): Sociology and Development Theories, Policies and Practices.

 

SOC 459:  GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT I

The course introduces students to the concept of gender, conceptual and methodological tools for analysis, and focuses on other relations and gender differences. It also considers the importance of gender in development issues and male bias. Some other major topics to be discussed include the following:  violence against women, Gender mainstream, men and women in politics, strategic gender needs, gender blind, gender bias, practical gender needs, triple roles (productive, reproductive, and community managing roles) and affirmative action.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Broydon L. & Chant S., (1988): Women in the Third World. Gender Issues in Rural and Urban Areas - New Jersey, Rutgers University Press. 
  • House, J. & Killick , T., (1985): ‘Social Justice  and Development Policy in Kenya’s Rural Economy’,  in Ghai, Dharam  and Radwan, Smir-ed. Agrarian Policy and Rural Poverty in Africa. Geneva; ILO

 

 SOC 460:  GENDER AND DEVELOPMENT II

The second semester focuses on gender analysis to particular areas of development, such as industrialisation, agrarian change, health, housing, employment, transport, structural adjustment programmes and environmental change. Other important areas to be considered are Policy making and gender awareness.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Broydon L. & Chant S., (1988): Women in the Third World. Gender Issues in Rural and Urban Areas - New Jersey, Rutgers University Press. 
  • House, J. &Killick , T., (1985): ‘Social Justice  and Development Policy in Kenya’s Rural Economy’,  in Ghai, Dharam  and Radwan, Smir-ed. Agrarian Policy and Rural Poverty in Africa. Geneva; ILO. 

 

SOC 461:  HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT I

The course covers the evolution of human resource management; its nature, meaning, concern and context. Human resource management philosophies and strategies, human resource function and job analysis are also discussed.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Armstrong, M., (2001): A Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice, London: Kogan Page Limited.
  • Torrington, D. & Hall, L., (1998): Human Resource Management, Harlow; Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 462:   HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT II

The course concentrates on the key activity areas of human resource management analysis, such as human resource planning, recruitment and selection, performance appraisal, training and development, reward management, employee relations, health and safety and contemporary human resource problems.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Armstrong, M., (2001): A Handbook of Human Resource Management Practice, London: Kogan Page Limited.
  • Torrington, D. & Hall, L., (1998): Human Resource Management, Harlow; Prentice Hall.

 

SOC 463:  MEDIA SOCIOLOGY I

This course introduces students to sociological importance of the mass media, problems of mass communication, and theories of communication and ethics. It essentially looks at the effects of communications media on society, especially Ghana, in terms of our view of the world, what we take to be factual and true, our culture and our everyday lives, whether at leisure or at work.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Vander-Zanden, J.W., (1990): Sociology; The Core, New York: McGraw Hill
  • Mills, C.W., (1970): The Sociological Imagination,Harmonsworth; Penguin.

 

SOC 464: MEDIA SOCIOLOGY II

The course examines the modern electronic broadcasting media (radio, television, satellite, cable) and also the increasingly converging information and telecommunication technologies. A critical analysis of aspects of globalization including dominance by global media conglomerates and their effects upon or resistance from national and local cultures is also examined.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Vander-Zanden, J.W., (1990): Sociology; The Core, New York: McGraw Hill
  • Mills, C.W., (1970): The Sociological Imagination,Harmonsworth; Penguin.

 

SOC 465:  SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION I

The course is designed to familiarize students with the definition, nature, and functions of religion and the importance of studying Sociology of Religion.  Here, the grounds of belief in God (ontological, cosmological, theological a theistic arguments), as well as the grounds for disbelief in God would be examined.  Also, the problem of evil, the challenge of modern science, organizational structures such as ecclesia, denomination, and cult are examined.  Other areas include religion and the environment as well as religious affiliation in contemporary society.(Karl Marx)

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Manheim, R. (1967): Myths, Religion and Mother Right, Selected Writings of J. J. Bachofen, Princeton University Press.
  • Hewitt, W.E., (1993): The Sociology of Religion; A Canadian Focus, Toronto, Butterworth’s Group of Companies.

 

SOC 466:  SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION II

At the end of the course, students would have been exposed to basic concepts and definition in African Traditional Religion, Christianity, Islam and other new religious movements.  There would also be some understanding of Charismaticism, Pentecostalism and the elements of the spiritual life.   Other areas to be covered in the course are new religious movements, religious fundamentalism, basis of religious conflicts, Karl Marx thoughts on sources of religious conflicts, religion and society, religion and social change, and the quest for just society.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Manheim, R. (1967): Myths, Religion and Mother Right, Selected Writings of J. J. Bachofen, Princeton University Press.
  • Hewitt, W.E., (1993): The Sociology of Religion; A Canadian Focus, Toronto, Butterworth’s Group of Companies.

 

SOC 467:   ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUE I

The course focuses on the use of statistics as a tool for social science research.  The emphasis is on teaching students how to use statistical reasoning to interpret and make informed decisions about empirical observations. It deals with issues such as levels of measurements, estimates and confidence interval, hypothesis testing, student test, Chi-square and ANOVA.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Allison, P. (1999) : Multiple Regression: A Primer. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Belsley, D.,  A., Kuh, E. K. & Welsh, R. E. (1980): Regression Diagnostics: Identifying influential Data and Sources of Collinearity. New York: Wiley.

 

SOC 468:   ADVANCED QUANTITATIVE TECHNIQUE II

The course aims at enhancing students’ knowledge on some important areas in statistics.  It measures association such as the scatter diagrams, multiple regression, and correlation and the co-efficient of determination and standard error of estimates.

  • Allison, P. (1999) : Multiple Regression: A Primer. Thousand Oaks, CA: Pine Forge Press.
  • Belsley, D., A., Kuh, E. K. & Welsh, R. E. (1980): Regression Diagnostics: Identifying influential Data and Sources of Collinearity. New York: Wiley.

 

SOC 469:  ENVIROMENTAL SOCIOLOGY I

The course examines the intricate relationship between ecology, human habitation and social organisation.  It addresses problems related to settlement patterns, population activities, cultural values and the impact which such activities (agricultural, mining, industrial, dam construction etc) endanger the habitat and the environment as a whole.  The course explores societal definition of environment, how society shapes the environment, foundations of environmental sociology.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Calhoun, L. & Davies G., (1994): Sociology, New York: McGraw-Hill
  • Apter, D., (1963), Ghana in Transition, New York: Polity Press.

 

SOC 470: ENVIRONMENTAL SOCIOLOGY II

It highlights environmental impact assessment procedures, as well as environmental management techniques and policy formulation.  Students would be equipped with knowledge to be able to assist business and communities in the development of sustainable, sound environmental procedures with resultant improvement in environmental performance, dynamics of transitional and local interests, environmental health, and environmental social movements, environmental justice ecological modernization, environmental regulation among others.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Calhoun, L. & Davies G., (1994): Sociology, New York: McGraw-Hill
  • Apter, D., (1963), Ghana in Transition, New York: Polity Press.

 

SOC 471:  CONFLICT AND PEACE BUILDING STUDIES

The course is aimed to improve students understanding in intra (with oneself) and inter (with others) processes of human interaction and interrelationship.  It offers students the opportunity to know and understand the basic elements of conflict and peace building strategies.  It focuses on prospects and opportunities, managing diversity, women and tradition of peace.  This course however, is an elective open to students from other disciplines within KNUST.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Mayer B. (2010): The dynamics of conflict resolution: a practitioner’s guide, John Wiley and Sons, USA.
  • Moran M.,(2008): Liberia; The Violence of Democracy, University of Pennsylvania Press, USA

 

SOC 472:  CONFLICT AND PEACE BUILDING STUDIES

The course is aimed to improve students understanding in intra (with oneself) and inter (with others) processes of human interaction and interrelationships in Peace building processes. It offers students the opportunity to know and understand the basic elements in peace building strategies. It focuses on peace building prospects and opportunities, managing diversity, traditional peace building processes and the role of women in peace building. This course however, is an elective open to students from other disciplines within KNUST interested in building and managing peace in society.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Mayer B. (2010): The dynamics of conflict resolution: a practitioner’s guide, John Wiley and sons, USA.
  • Moran M., (2008): Liberia; the Violence of Democracy, University of Pennsylvania Press, USA.

 

SOC 490: LONG ESSAY

Students would be expected to write long essay under supervision.  Students would write on any topic of their choice provided it is related to sociology, and its practices in Ghana.