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Course Objectives

Aim

The overall goal of the B. A. Social Work programme is to equip students with knowledge, values and skills for social work practice.

Objectives

  1. To develop the skills of students to think objectively and analytically about ways in which social forces affect our everyday lives.
  2. To prepare students to understand the perspectives of persons with different cultural, ethnic and social backgrounds.
  3. To prepare students to understand the role of social policy in promoting social and economic justice.
  4.  To train students to apply problem-solving methods of engagement, assessment, planning, goal-setting, monitoring and termination.
  5. To train students to support and uphold professional standards, values and ethics in social work practice.

YEAR ONE

SOWK 155INTRODUCTION TO THE NATURE AND PROFESSION OF SOCIAL WORK

This course introduces students to the nature of social work by highlighting on the knowledge base, skills and roles of the would-be social worker. It traces the various movements and works leading to the professionalization of social work.  Students are given an overview of the characteristics of a profession. It further links social work to the indicators of a profession and justifies why social work qualifies to be classified as a professional activity. It also focuses on social work as a helping profession attracting mostly the poor, marginalized and the oppressed as their clients.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures & Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Dubois, B. and Miley Karla K. (2005). Social Work: an Empowering Profession (5thed.). Boston: Allyn & Bacon.
  • Sowers, K. M. &Dulmus, C. M. (2008). Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare, the Profession of Social Work. NJ: Wiley and Sons Inc.

 

SOWK 156: HISTORY AND PHILOSOPHY OF SOCIAL WORK

The course traces the historical roots of social work and examines some of the major theoretical paradigms guiding its current development. The main focus would be to delve into the history and philosophy that has shaped social work practice up to the 21st century.  It is expected that, students at the end of this course will appreciate the historical trends within which Social Work has developed over time and the philosophy guiding its practice.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sajid, I. A. (2011). Introduction to Social Work and Philosophy of Social Work. India; University of Peshawar.
  • Sowers, K. M. &Dulmus, C. M. (2008). Comprehensive Handbook of Social Work and Social Welfare, the Profession of Social Work. NJ: Wiley and Sons Inc.

 

SOWK 157INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL WELFARE

This course introduces students to the various types of institutions that provide social welfare services, indicating their importance in society and why it is an essential knowledge for all social workers.  Welfare institutions in Ghana will be examined in relation to the prevailing political, legal and economic systems.  The course is structured around five key themes: the historical context of social welfare institutions; types of institutions, the organisational structure and management styles, challenges faced by such institutions and the future directions.  All these themes will be examined by discussing the concept globally with a focus on the Ghanaian context.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Ashman, K. K. (2008). Introduction to Social Welfare, Politics and Public Policy. Wisconsin: Strawberry Field Publishing.
  • Marx, J. D., Broussard, C. A., Hopper, F. A., & Worster, D. (2011). Social Work and Social Welfare. Boston, USA: Pearson Education Inc.

 

SOWK 158:  SOCIAL POLICY

The course is designed to introduce students to the study of social policy.  It focuses on the theory and practice of social policy, specifically as an academic discipline and a subject area.  Further, it will introduce students to some key concepts, theories and techniques employed in policy analysis; with a focus on social welfare issues in Ghana.  Social Policy analysis is an interdisciplinary field that uses theories, concepts, and methods from disciplines such as economics, sociology, and political science to address substantive issues in the social policy arena.  Social work practice is influenced and driven by social policy hence an understanding of policy analysis is a relevant skill to ensure a better examination of social policies and how they affect identified stakeholders. 

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Alcock, P.; May, M. and Wright, S. (2012) The Student Companion to Social Policy. Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Hartely, D. (2012). Social Policy. Cambridge: Polity.

 

MATH 153:   STATISTICAL METHODS I

This introduces the basic concept of statistics. It deals with the nature and uses of basic statistical information and some basic concepts.  It is concerned mainly with descriptive analysis of data viz. graphic and tabular representation of data, calculation of measures of central tendency and dispersion; coefficients of skewness and kurtosis.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Freedman, D. (2000): Statistical Models and Causal Inference: A Dialogue with the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, Chapters 1-3, 8.
  • Jackman, S. (2009):. Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences. John Wiley and Sons.

 

MATH 154:  STATISTICAL METHODS II

This continues with Math 153 and deals with the following: Probability - definition of some basic terms; conditional and independent events; some basic laws and rules in probability; random variables and probability distributions; expectations and variance of random variables; discrete distributions; binomial and poisson; continuous distributions - normal and sampling theory.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Freedman, D. (2000): Statistical Models and Causal Inference: A Dialogue with the Social Sciences. Cambridge University Press, Chapters 1-3, 8.
  • Jackman, S. (2009):. Bayesian Analysis for the Social Sciences. John Wiley and Sons.

 

ENGL 157: COMMUNICATION SKILLS 1

The course takes all first year students through a review of English grammar, and is a required course for all first year students of the KNUST.  Students will be assisted to review some of the common problem areas of their writing, such as verb/tense system, concord, sentence construction and paragraph organisation.  There shall also be a study of basic grammatical structures that shall involve teaching students to write formally correct sentences, avoiding sentence errors, and using punctuation marks effectively.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Deux, M., (2009): A communicative Approach. 4th Edition. McGraw Hill Higher Education.
  • Leo J., (1994): A communicative Grammar Practice. Cambridge University Press.

 

ENGL 158: COMMUNICATION SKILLS II

This course is designed to continue the process of helping students to become better writers. This second part of the course will focus on writing skills - paragraphs, and then essays.  Students shall also study the preparation of technical documents such as memos, reports, letters, and proposals.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Deux, M. (2009). A communicative Approach. 4th Edition. McGraw Hill Higher Education.
  • Leo, J., (1994). A communicative Grammar Practice. Cambridge University Press.

 

CSM 183: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS I

General Introduction to Computers: Generation and Classification  of Computers, Basic Parts of a Desktop Computer, Processing Devices, Input/Output Devices, Storage Devices, System Software, Application Software. The Windows Operating System: Basic Windows Features, The Control Panel, File Management. Word Processing using MS-Word: Basics of Word processing using MS-Word, Checking Spelling and Grammar Mistakes, Working with Hyperlinks, Formatting and Printing Text, Inserting Illustrations, Modifying Page Layout, Working with Headers and Footers, Finding and Replacing Text, Using references, Adding New Citation  and Sources to a Document, Generating a Bibliography, Indexes and Table of Content, Mail Merge.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sawyer, W. H., (2000): Using Information Technology: A practical introduction to Computers & Communications. Second Edition. McGraw Hill.
  • Hutchinson, S., (2007). Computers: The user perspective. Second Edition. Mosby College publishing.

 

CSM 184: INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS II

Introduction to MS-Excel: Creating and Editing Worksheets, Formulas and Functions, Formatting Worksheets, Printing Worksheets, Creating Excel Charts (Graphs), Sorting and Filtering Data.  Introduction to MS-Power Point: The Basics of Creating Presentations, About Slides and Layouts, Different Slide Views, Basics of Inserting and Editing Text, Formatting Text, Themes and Background Styles, Starting A Slide Show, Inserting Pictures, Sound and Movies, Inserting and Modifying Clip Art, Ordering Objects, Inserting Charts, Viewing and Printing Charts, Animating Text and Objects, Applying Transitions.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Sawyer, W. H., (2000): Using Information Technology: A practical introduction to Computers & Communications. Second Edition. McGraw Hill.
  • Hutchinson, S., (2007). Computers: The user perspective. Second Edition. Mosby College publishing.

 

YEAR TWO

SOWK 257: WORKING WITH INDIVIDUALS - SOCIAL CASE WORK

This course will focus on the uniqueness of the individual and the direct services offered for prevention and alleviation of problems to make them socially functional. It will also undertake a critical and historical review of competing ideologies on social case work as a practice and discourse. The process of social case work as well as techniques for working with individuals will be explored. The course will equip students with the skills for working with individuals.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Matthew, Grace (1992). An Introduction to Social Casework. Tata Institute of Social Sciences.
  • Upadhyay, R. K. (2010). Social CaseworkA Therapeutic Approach. India: Rawat Publications.

 

SOWK 258WORKING WITH GROUPS – GROUP WORK

The course is designed to give students an understanding of group dynamics, experience in group facilitation and an understanding of the group process in relation to social work process.  Focusing on small groups, emphasis is on integrating interpersonal and analytic skills in learning effective helping strategies in group practice. Practice will be examined within a structural framework that acknowledges the influence of socio-economic status, race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and ability in shaping personal and social well-being.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Corey, G. (2005).Therapy and Practice of Group Counselling. Belmont CA: Brooks/Cole Thomson learning Inc.
  • Northen, H. and Kurland, R. (2001) Social Work with Groups. (3rd edn.) New York: Columbia University Press.

 

 SOWK 259:  DEVELOPMENTAL SOCIAL WORK

This course focuses on how the social work profession can be used as a tool for development.  Students will be introduced to developmental social work tracing its history, theoretical assumptions and strategies.  Also the concept of social development which emphasises social relations, institutional arrangements and political processes that are central to efforts to achieve desirable development outcomes will be discussed.  These are linked with the social workers’ skills of using the strengths and empowerment approaches to enhance the lives of their clients.  The objective is to equip students with the knowledge and skills to promote the well-being of the population as a whole by strengthening economic development with a social intent.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Midgley, James and Conley, Amy (2010). Social Work and Social Development: Theories and Skills for Developmental Social Work. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • UN (2012). The United Nations Development Strategy Beyond 2015. NY: United Nations.

 

SOWK 260: SOCIAL WELFARE POLICIES AND PROGRAMMES IN GHANA

Social welfare policies and programmes in Ghana exhibit some of the legacies of colonial rule.  Hence to better understand 21st century social welfare policies and programmes in Ghana it will be beneficial for students to be knowledgeable of past social welfare policies.  Using social welfare policy analysis methods this course Social Welfare Policies and Programmes in Ghana, seeks to examine the successes, failures and lessons learnt, including how global policy practices have influenced social welfare issues from colonial days to contemporary years in Ghana. The course adopts a theoretical and applied approach to ensure a better understanding of social welfare issues in Ghana.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Aryeetey, E., & Goldstein, M. (2000). Ghana social policy reform in Africa. In D. A. Morales-Gómez, N. Tschirgi& J. L. Moher (Eds.), Reforming social policy: Changing perspectives on sustainable human development (1st ed., pp. 9-44). Ottawa: International Development Research Centre.
  • Marx, J. D., Broussard, C. A., Hopper, F. A., and Worster, D. (2011). Social Work and Social Welfare. Boston, USA: Pearson Education Inc.

 

 SOWK 261TECHNIQUES OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

This course introduces students to techniques common to all social work practice including the different levels. Students will explore basic communication and helping skills, skills for managing caseload and techniques for personal and professional development. Additionally students will acquire the techniques for engaging with specific clients who are for example manipulative, dangerous, involuntary, hard-to-reach and chemically dependent.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Cummin, L.K., Sevel, J.A. and Pedrick, L.E. (2006). Social Work Skills Demonstrated: Beginning Direct Practice Text-Workbook. NY: Pearson, Allyn& Bacon.
  • Sheafor, B.W., Horejsi, C.R. and Horelsi, G. A. (2000). Techniques and Guidelines for Social Work Practice. NY: Allyn& Bacon.

 

 SOWK 262:  WORKING WITH COMMUNITIES

The course aims at introducing students to social work with communities. It focuses on the concept and functions of communities. The course is a building block for working effectively in communities, organizations and nations as a social worker.  The course affords students the opportunity to know and understand community entry techniques and the characteristics of community life by focusing on the understanding of the complex problems of communities of the third world, and the role of the state in the development of local communities. The overall objective is to promote deeper appreciation of the social institutions of communities and also equip students with the requisite knowledge to analyse and manage human relations in communities.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Brueggemann, W.G. (2014).The Practice of Macro Social Work, U.S.A, Wadsworth Group.
  • Mendes, P. P. (2009). Teaching community development to social work students: A critical reflection. Community Development Journal, 44 (2) 248–262.

 

ENGL 263:  LITERATURE IN ENGLISH I

This is a basic course in literature, introducing all University students to opportunities to enjoy and to love the world of books in English.  The course will also draw on the vast stock of Africa’s oral literary heritage and performance traditions.  Given the wide range of disciplinary backgrounds and interests of the students who are expected to take this course, the selection of texts will take into consideration the interrelations of literature and other disciplines.  The course will focus on poetry and drama.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Bain, C., Beaty, J. and Hunter P. J., (2001): The Norton Introduction to Literature. W. W Norton & Company.
  • Bertens, H., (2009): Literary Theory: The Basics. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. TJ International Ltd. Padstow, Cornwall.

 

ENGL 264: LITERATURE IN ENGLISH II

This course has its main components i.e. the study of folktales, short stories and novels.  African and Western texts representative of this genre shall be used to illustrate the language, themes, and the literary devices employed for these different types of fictional expressions.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures& Discussions

Recommended reading material:

  • Bain, C., Beaty, J., Hunter, P. J., (2001). The Norton Introduction to Literature. W. W Norton & Company.
  • Bertens, H., (2009): Literary Theory: The Basics. Routledge Taylor & Francis Group. TJ International Ltd. Padstow, Cornwall.

 

YEAR THREE

Taught courses in year three would be offered for only one semester. The second semester is devoted to Practicum.

 

SOWK 351THEORIES OF SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE

The objective of this course is to examine the various theories and perspectives that have influenced social work as a helping profession and academic discipline. This includes the medical model, systems analysis, ecological approach, problem solving approach, strength approach, among others.  Also key African authors like Nana Apt, James Midgley and OseiHwedie will be critically discussed.  This course will enable students to appreciate the theoretical foundation of social work methodology.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Apt, Nana Araba (1996) Coping with Old Age in a Changing Africa. Avebury: Aldershot.
  • Kreitzer, Linda (2012) Social work in Africa: Exploring culturally relevant social work in Ghana. Alberta: University of Calgary Press.
  • Osei-Hwidie, Kwaku (1995) A Search for Legitimate Social Development Education and Practice Models for Africa. Lewiston, New York: Edwin Mellen Press.
  • Payne, M. (2005). Modern social work theory. (3rd Ed). Chicago, Illinois: Lyceum Books Inc.
  • Walsh, J. (2006). Theories of Direct Social Work Practice. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

 SOWK 353RESEARCH METHODS IN SOCIAL WORK

Research is fundamental to any discipline that deals with social phenomena. This course thus aims at equipping students with tools and skills that are needed in social investigation. It is expected that at the end of the course students would be able to collect and analyse data so as to make meaning out of the data collected and thus provide answers to questions, and solutions to the many problems of social work clients.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Marlow, R. (2011). Research Methods for Generalist Social Work. USA: Brook/Cole- Thompson Learning.
  • Dudley, J. (2011). Research Methods for Social Work. NY: Pearson Education Inc.

 

SOWK 355GENERAL PRACTICE IN SOCIAL WORK 

This course introduces students to the general practice in social work. It will cover social work methodology, case work, group work, community development, social work administration and reflective practice. A grasp of these various methods are essential for field work. This course will thus usher students into the problems, challenges and the exciting aspects of the field work. Students after this should be able to serve as general practitioners in social work.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Cummin, L.K., Sevel, J.A., &Pedrick, L.E. (2006). Social Work Skills Demonstrated: Beginning Direct Practice Text-Workbook. NY: Pearson, Allyn& Bacon.
  • Parker, J., Bradley, G. (2007). Social Work Practice: Assessment, Planning, Intervention and Review. Exeter: Learning Matters.

 

 SOWK 369INTERNATIONAL SOCIAL WORK

As the world increasing becomes a global economy, the profession of social work has a significant role in ensuring the wellbeing of people irrespective of their country of origin.  Students who offer this course will examine the historical trends in globalisation, the positive and negative influences it is producing for people around the world; for example in relation to poverty, cultural diversity, trans-national organisations and corporations, philanthropy, migration and terrorism.  It is expected that at the end of the course students would understand how the profession’s values of respect of diversity, self-determination and individual dignity can minimise conflicts among the various civilisation of the world.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Glicken, Morley D. (2010). Social Work in the 21st century. London:  Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks.
  • Stiglitz, J.E. (2002). Globalisation and its discontents. NY: Penguins.

 

SOWK 359:  SOCIAL WORK AND THE LAW

This course introduces students the relationship between Social Work Practice and the Law. Understanding of the Law underpins and provides duties and powers for social work as the statutory and legal requirements are essential for effective and fair social work practice.  The introduction of key Social Work Values like choice, partnership, empowerment, anti-discriminatory and anti-oppressive practices and the extent to which these values are supported by the Law is examined. Some of the areas to be treated include: the justice system in Ghana, rights and duties, powers of the state and of the citizenry, and relevant Ghanaian legislations.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Braye, S. and Preston-Shoot, M. (2006). The role of law in welfare reform: critical perspectives on the relationship between law and social work practice. International Journalof Social Welfare, 15(1) 19–26.
  • Pollack, D., (2003).Social Work and the Courts: A casebook . New York: Brunner-Routledge.

 

SOWK 361WORKING WITH THE AGED

In this course the well-being of older Ghanaians is examined in relation to socio-economic, cultural and political factors.  It focuses on health service, leisure, financial assistance and day-care centres among others providing services to the aged. More specifically the life experience and conditions of the aged are studied in relation to factors such as class, gender, ethnicity and support systems. The course intends to introduce students to the theories of aging and factors determining the independence and well-being of an elderly population.  Students who opt for this course will end up as advocates for the aged and ensuring that their welfare is well catered for.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Berfman, L. (2007). Facing Death, Image, Insight and Interventions. New York: Hemisphere Publishers.
  • Greene, Roberta, R. (2008). Social Work with the Aged and Their Families. Austin, USA: Aldine Transaction.

 

SOWK 363SOCIAL WORK WITH CHILDREN

This course, Social Work with Children, introduces students to the knowledge and skills needed to work with children who are in need of care and protection.  Students will have the opportunity to examine international and national frameworks for the care of children; have a better understanding of the child welfare system in Ghana and acquire the skills of assessing children using the child rights approach.  It is expected that at the end of the course students would have the knowledge to advocate for child rights as well as promote activities that benefit children.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Kirton, Derek (2009). Child Social Work Policy & Practice. London: SAGE Publications Ltd.
  • Kehily, Mary Jane (2009). An Introduction to Childhood Studies.  England: Open University.

 

SOWK 365MEDICAL SOCIAL WORK

The focus is to equip students who intend to work as medical social workers. Areas of analysis would include health institutions, interactions between patients and health personnel, working with mental health patients, counselling (both patients and relatives) etc. It is expected that at the end of the course students would be equipped with the needed skills to work in hospitals and other medical settings.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Johnson J.L., Grant J.R. (2004). Medical Social Work. NY: Pearson Education Inc.
  • Heinonen, T. and Metteri, A. (2005) Social Work in Health and Mental Health; Issues, Developments and Actions. Toronto: Canadian Scholars’ Press Inc.

 

SOWK 367SOCIAL WORK IN INDUSTRIAL ORGANISATION

The trained social worker is increasingly in demand in industry to provide welfare services like canteens, crèches, recreational activities and counselling among others to industrial workers. Other important areas of study would be the following: the role of industrial social worker, work ethics, workman compensation and the balance of interest between employees and the organisation. This course would equip students with the needed skills to execute or undertake welfare services in the industrial organisation.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Bissel, G. (2012). Organisational behaviour for Social Work.  Boston, MA: Allyn and Bacon.
  • Jaskyte, K. (2009). Management and Administration in Social Work Practice. Oxford, UK: Oxford Press.

 

SOWK 390: PRACTICUM

The Practicum is a core requirement of the B.A. Social Work programme. The Practicum refers to the entire course for the semester; consisting of three components: field placements, reflective seminars and written requirements.  Students who qualify to participate in the placement will be deemed to have completed all core courses before the start of the programme. Third year students who satisfy the requirement for placement shall be expected to complete 400 hour field attachment programme.  The main objective of the Practicum is to help students combine the acquired theoretical knowledge with a vocational orientation to enable them build practice skills for effective social delivery.

 

  

YEAR FOUR

SOWK 451HUMAN BEHAVIOUR IN SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT I

Understanding human behaviour is central to any helping activity. This course explores the nature of human beings and the factors that account for human behaviour within the context of a particular environment. Some of the major topics are conceptual issues, theories of development, family in society, communities and organisations, spiritual development, social development in infancy and childhood. At the end of the course students would appreciate the existence of different categories of personalities and be able to design programmes to meet all kinds of people.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Ashford, J.B., LeCroy, C.W. &Lortie, K.L. (2006). Human Behaviour in the Social Environment. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.
  • Zastrow, C.H. and Kirst-Ashman, K.K. (2010). Understanding Human Behaviour and the Social Environment. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

SOWK 452HUMAN BEHAVIOUR IN SOCIAL ENVIRONMENT II

This course uses theories and concepts from behavioural science that focuses on interactions between and among individuals and groups, social, economic and environmental systems in which they live. Concepts from psychology and social sciences that relate to various aspects of normal development, integration, and socialization in later life are examined, as well as theories of stress and crises. The impact of social structure and processes on individual, family, and work roles over time is emphasized.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Lesser, J.G. & Pope, D.S. (2007). Human Behaviour and the Social Environment: Theory and Practice. Boston: Pearson Education, Inc.
  • Zastrow, C.H. and Kirst-Ashman, K.K. (2010). Understanding Human Behaviour and the Social Environment. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole.

 

 SOWK 453APPROACHES TO COUNSELLING IN SOCIAL WORK I

This course explores the relationship between social work and counselling, and the use of counselling theories, values and skills within social work practice. It also treats some current issues emerging from counselling and social work.  Specifically, it examines the relationship between counsellors and their service users, values and ethics of counselling among others.  At the end of the course students would understand the principles of counselling and be able to use them in practice.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Corey, G. (2005).Therapy and Practice of Group CounsellingBelmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Thomson learning Inc.
  • Pope, V. S. & Vasquez, M. J. T (2011). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practice Guide. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons.

 

SOWK 454: APPROACHES TO COUNSELLING IN SOCIAL WORK II

This course focuses on various psychological and social theories that influence the counselling profession. It looks at areas such as psychoanalysis, person-centred, behaviour modification and rational emotive theories. The overall objective is to equip students with knowledge and skills in counselling, which is a vital tool in social work practice.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Corey, G. (2005).Therapy and Practice of Group Counselling. Belmont, CA: Brooks/Cole Thomson learning Inc.
  • Pope, V. S. & Vasquez, M. J. T (2011). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practice Guide. Hoboken, New Jersey: John Wiley and Sons.

 

SOWK 455:  COMMUNICATION IN SOCIAL WORK

In this course, students will be introduced to communication in social work. The course would equip students with communication skills that are central to assessment, interviewing and counselling in social work practice.  Areas to be covered include observation, listening techniques, and barriers to communication, among others.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Pearson, Judy, Nelson, Paul & Paul Titsworth, Paul (2003). Human communication. New York: McGraw Hill.
  • Allen E. Ivey & Mary Braford Ivey (2007). Intentional interviewing and counselling: Facilitating client development in a multicultural society. Belmont, USA: Thomson Brooks /Cole.

 

SOWK 456:  CULTURE IN SOCIAL WORK

This course focuses on how culture influences the social work professional practice.  The course aims at introducing students to the understanding of culture and its function in human behaviour and society. By recognising the strengths that exist in all cultures, the knowledge base of clients culture and demonstrate competence in the provision of services that are sensitive to the culture of various clients and the difference among people and cultural groups.  Further, the emphasis will be on cultural competence in Social Work Practice by enabling students to understand the nature of social diversity and oppression with respect to race, ethnicity, national origin, colour, sex, religion and mental or physical disability.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • National Association of Social Workers. (2000). NASW code of ethics. Washington, DC: NASW.
  • Ivey, Allen E.  & Ivey, Mary Braford (2007). Intentional interviewing and counseling: Facilitating client development in a multicultural society. Belmont, USA: Thomson Brooks /Cole.

  

SOWK 457:  WORKING WITH PEOPLE LIVING WITH DISABILITIES I

This course introduces students to social work with People Living with Disabilities by exploring the historical evolution of disability and its perception in various cultures and traditions. It also examines the forms of disabilities and the dominant belief system which promotes individual and medical model interpretations of disability. Students would acquire knowledge in the causes of impairment and the creation of disability as well as disability within the family and social work response in managing it.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, case work and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Oliver, M. and Sapey, B. (2006) Social Work with Disabled People (3rd Edition). New York:  Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Turner, M.A., Herbig, C., Kaye, D., Fenderson, J. and Levy, D. (2005) Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities: Barriers at Every Step. Washington DC: The Urban Institute.

 

 SOWK 458WORKING WITH PEOPLE LIVING WITH DISABILITIES II

This course is designed to give students an understanding of the forms of disabilities and associated theories. Particular focus will be on disability in Ghana and issues of concern to the disabled in the Ghanaian Society. The course will also examine interventions and legislations aimed at ensuring inclusiveness and empowerment of the disabled including work with governmental and non-governmental agencies.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Oliver M., Sapey, B. (2006) Social Work with Disabled People (3rd Edition). New York:  Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Sackey, E. (2009). Strengthening the Disability Movement in Ghana Project. Ghana Federation of the Disabled. 

 

 SOWK 459WOMEN’S WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT I

Social workers must commit themselves to enhancing the wellbeing of women and girls as an essential aspect of the profession’s ethical and practice commitment to human rights.  More so, as over two-thirds of social work clients and practitioners are women, therefore feminist theory offers a relevant framework for the assessment of social functioning and the design and implementations of interventions to enhance the functioning of individuals, families, groups, organisations, communities and society.  This is a two semester course; in this first semester emphasis will be on feminist theories and the approaches to women development which includes the empowerment approach.  This is to equip students with the theoretical underpinnings that informs laws, theories and programmes to ensure the wellbeing of women.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Leskošek, Vesna (2009). Teaching Gender in Social Work. StockholmATHENA
  • Nussbaum, Martha C. (2001). Women and Human Development. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

SOWK 460:  WOMEN’S WELFARE AND DEVELOPMENT II

This course builds on the areas studied in the first semester, under the same title, by examining the international and national legal frameworks. Emphasis will be placed on gender mainstreaming activities in Ghana and the various approaches to women empowerment including policies and programmes.  The course covers areas such as: women’s rights legislations, legislations focusing on women in Ghana, the economy and women, women and education, women’s health and benefits of gender equality to men.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Shahrashoub, Razavi and Miller, Carol (1995). From WID to GAD: Conceptual Shifts in the Women and Development Discourse.  Geneva: United Nations Research Institute.
  • Nussbaum, Martha C. (2001). Women and Human Development. New York: Cambridge University Press.

 

SOWK 461AGENCIES AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I

The course focuses on the role of agencies in social work practice. Analysis would focus on activities and operations of agencies, the structure and administration of agencies as well as the problems and challenges facing agencies. At the end of the course students will develop administrative skills and competence to establish or manage social work agency.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Charles Zastrow (2004). Introduction to social work and social welfare: Empowering people (8thedn.). Belmont: Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning.
  • Walsh, Joseph (2008). Generalist Social Work Practice: Intervention Methods. US: Cengage Learning, Inc.

 

SOWK 462AGENCIES AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II

The course continues with the topics in Semester I and further explores the work of agencies in the social sector in Ghana that deliver specific services to clients.  It also focuses on the role of the social worker in the service delivery process in these agencies.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Zastrow, Charles (2004). Introduction to social work and social welfare: Empowering people (8thedn.). Belmont: Brooks/Cole Thomson Learning.
  • Walsh, Joseph (2008). Generalist Social Work Practice: Intervention Methods. US: Cengage Learning, Inc.

 

SOWK 463: WORKING WITH PEOPLE AT RISK I

Most vulnerable groups are a risk to themselves and society at large. This course aims at equipping students with the skills of identifying and appreciating people at risk, such as People Living with Aids (PLWA), cancer patients, and mentally ill patients, among others. At the end of the course, students would be able to help people at risk and their families.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Oliver, M. and Sapey, B. (2006). Social Work with Disabled People (3rd Edition). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Roulstone, A. and Barnes, C. (2005) Working Futures? Disabled People, Policy and Social Inclusion. Bristol. UK: The Policy Press.

 

SOWK 464: WORKING WITH PEOPLE AT RISK II

It is expected that at the end of the course students would be able to design interventions for people at risk so that they would accept and live with such patients as members of their respective families.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Oliver, M. and Sapey, B. (2006). Social Work with Disabled People (3rd Edition). New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Turner, M. A., Herbig, C., Kaye, D., Fenderson, J. and Levy, D. (2005). Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities: Barriers at Every Step. Washington DC: The Urban Institute.

 

SOWK 465URBAN TRANSFORMATION AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE I

This course examines the problems resulting from rapid urban transformation. Industrialisation, urbanisation and associated individualism of urban living have created many social problems which social workers are expected to solve.  It evaluates intervention strategies being implemented and makes recommendations for addressing the problems.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Yankson, P. W. K. (2006). Urbanisation and national development: Challenges and Prospects of Economic Reform and Globalisation. Accra, Ghana: Universities Press.
  • Murray, M. J. & Myers, G. A. (2007). Cities in Contemporary Africa. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

 

SOWK 466URBAN TRANSFORMATION AND SOCIAL WORK PRACTICE II

This course continues to examine urban social problems that social workers are expected to deal with, such as homelessness, street children, child labour, unemployment, public health, urban poverty, slums, and urban housing. Also contemporary issues and transformations will be discussed.  It is expected that at the end of the course, students will be in a position to resolve urban social problems.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Yankson, P. W. K. (2006). Urbanisation and national development: Challenges and Prospects of Economic Reform and Globalisation. Accra, Ghana: Universities Press.
  • Murray, M. J. & Myers, G. A. (2007). Cities in Contemporary Africa. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.

 

SOWK 477SOCIAL WORK AND TECHNOLOGY I

Technology has changed social work practice offering new ways to perform services and obtain information. The challenges that it brings require a special set of skills and knowledge to provide the best practice available.  The focus of this course is to examine the importance of the practical use of the application of tools of technology in social work practice in Ghana. The course discusses the use and application of tools of technology in social work organisational communication, case processing and planning, and social work research.  It also examines the advantages and disadvantages of technology to the practice of social work in Ghana.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Andrew, M., & Potts, J. (2003). Culture and technology. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • NASW (2005) Technology and Social Work Practice. Washington: National Association of Social Workers.

 

 SOWK 478SOCIAL WORK AND TECHNOLOGY II

This is a continuation of the first semester course, the effects of technology on the social relationships and social interactions of agency workers, worker-and-client as well as client-to -client are explored.  The course explores more technical standards that social work Agency and Non-Governmental Organisations need to address to increase inter-Agency compatibility and increase quality service delivery and cost effectiveness.  The course discusses the use of corporate software and their application to social work practice and explains how students may be able to use Information Reporting System and also Decision Support systems in social work practice in Ghana.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Andrew, M., & Potts, J. (2003). Culture and technology. New York: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • NASW (2005) Technology and Social Work Practice. Washington: National Association of Social Workers.

 

SOWK 469: WORKING WITH FAMILIES I

The focus of this course is to help students grasp the principles and tools of social work in the family context. The course offers practical and pragmatic aspects of engaging with families and provides the needed basic understanding to family functioning by examining family strengths and resilience.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Collins, D., Jordan, C., & Coleman, H. (2007). An Introduction to Family Social Work (2nd. Edition) Boston, USA: Brooks/Cole.
  • Walsh, F. (2003). Normal Family Process (2nd Edition).  Boston, USA: The Guilford Press.

 

 SOWK 470:  WORKING WITH FAMILIES II

The preceding course laid a foundation for discussing the phases of working with families. This course builds on the foundation laid and explores principles of effective communication, paying special attention to skills required in working with families. The course explores the five phases of the helping process to working with families from the moment a client is referred for help. It describes the task involved in engaging with families and assessing needs to determine appropriate intervention and monitoring up to evaluation and termination.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Collins, D., Jordan, C., & Coleman, H. (2007). An Introduction to Family Social Work. (2nd. Edition) Boston, USA: Brooks/Cole.
  • Walsh, F. (2003). Normal Family Process. (2nd Edition).  Boston, USA: The Guilford Press.

 

SOWK 471:   COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

The focus of the course is to introduce students to the nature and definition of community development, functions of communities, skills of a community developer and social work in communities. Students are expected to gain an understanding of the complex problems confronting community development of the third world, the meaning and causes of poverty and the role of the state in the development of communities. The overall objective is to promote deeper appreciation of the social institutions of various communities and also equip students with the requisite knowledge to analyse and manage problems that confront community work.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Amedro, D. K. Albert (2005). Theory and Practice of Community Education, A Comparative Study of Nordic, British, Canadian and Ghanaian Experiments. Accra- Ghana: Ghana University Press.
  • Brueggemann, W.G. (2014). The Practice of Macro Social Work. U.S.A, Wadsworth Group.

 

SOWK 472: COMMUNITY ORGANISATION AND DEVELOPMENT

The focus of the course is to equip students with the understanding of the definition and the nature of community organisations and development. It again aims at equipping students with the skills to mobilise community members to engage in self-help initiatives. Students who opt for this course are introduced to how to write proposals for funding in order to equip community members and move them from marginalisation. Topics to be covered include: Community Organisation for development, Participatory Rural Appraisals and Proposal writing.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • Brueggemann, W.G. (2014). The Practice of Macro Social Work. U.S.A.: Wadsworth Group.
  • Ife, J. (2009). Human Rights from Below, Achieving Rights through Community Development. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

 

SOWK 473:  DRUGS IN SOCIETY: THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE I

This course examines the extent and nature of alcohol and other drug use from a structural social work perspective, and suggests strategies for social work practice.  It   provides a historical context of drug policy, offers theoretical explanations of drug dependence, and explores various government initiatives to deal with the issue of drug use and abuse.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Robert, Religoli M. (2000). Delinquency in Society. NY: McGraw Hill.
  • Paylor, I., Measham, F. and Asher, H. (2012). Social Work and Drug Use.  Maidenhead, England: McGraw-Hill.

 

SOWK 474:  DRUGS IN SOCIETY: THEORY, POLICY AND PRACTICE II

This course describes major social and psychological theories relating to substance abuse. Special issues related to women, youth, the homeless and the dually diagnosed mentally ill/substance abusing populations are explored. Selected social policies and service delivery issues are considered.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures and case work

Recommended reading material:

  • Robert, Religoli M.  (2000). Delinquency in Society. NY: McGraw Hill.
  • Paylor, I., Measham, F. and Asher, H. (2012). Social Work and Drug Use.  Maidenhead, England: McGraw-Hill.

 

SOWK 475SOCIAL JUSTICE SYSTEM, DEVIANCE AND CRIMINOLOGY

This course explores the social defence concept and challenges in our justice system, crime trends in Ghana, crime and vulnerable groups, prison reforms and correctional strategies such as juvenile justice and non-custodial measures. The study of social deviance focuses on the causes of crime. More especially, it describes the diverse and, at times, competing perspectives within criminology, and their attempts to explain why certain types of people engage in certain types of behaviour that have been identified as criminal in nature. The aim is to introduce students to the study of crime, and in so doing to explore a series of issues relating to the definition and measurement of crime. A major part of the study would describe the theoretical explanations of criminality.  By the end of the course, students will be able to explain crime and different perspectives that are brought to bear upon criminological analysis.

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • White, Rob and Haines, Fiona (2000).  Crime and Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
  • Weitzer, Ronald (2002). Deviance and Social Control; A reader. NY: McGraw Hill.

 

SOWK 476:  CORRECTIONAL SERVICES: WORKING WITH OFFENDERS

This course examines the comparative correctional services systems, legislations management, law of criminal procedure, correctional service law, prison matters, etc. The course will equip students with skills in applying selected legal, administrative techniques within the context of correctional services management in supporting and implementing strategies, policies and procedures. 

Mode of Delivery: Lectures, group work, field trips and presentations

Recommended reading material:

  • MacKenzie, Doris Layton (2006). What works in corrections: Reducing the criminal activities of offenders and delinquents. New York: Cambridge University press.
  • White, Rob and Haines, Fiona (2000).  Crime and Criminology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

SOWK 490: LONG ESSAY

Students would be expected to write a long essay under supervision.  Students should write on any topic of their choice provided it is related to social work.  The Long essay covers both semesters in the fourth year.  Every student is mandated to complete this individual long essay; it is in partial fulfilment for the award of a Bachelor of Arts degree.